Update on “60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Richmond” and more hiking

60 Hikes Within 60 Miles of RichmondAfter nearly three years of research, hikes, writing, editing, proofing, more editing…we’re finally almost to the release of the 3rd edition of “60 Hikes Within 60 Miles: Richmond.” It is expected to be out in June. Take a look at the information page on the Menasha Ridge Press website. Continue reading

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‘Autonomy’ drives from the beginnings toward the future with driverless vehicles

IMG_1291I’ve been curious about automated vehicles and how they will alter and revolutionize so many aspects of our daily lives within the coming generation.

I read more about the history of the development of autonomous vehicles in “Autonomy,” by Lawrence D. Burns, a former GM executive who also worked with Google’s self-driving car project. The book is written from the perspective of a man who has spent nearly two decades in the middle of it all. I’ve gained a little more confidence in this automotive technology and the life-altering opportunity that lies ahead for our planet. Continue reading

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Try a year of cycling for better physical, mental health

img_20190116_134318904New Year’s resolutions are often hard to make into a habit. If exercising more is one of them, January weather can make it more of an indoor effort. If riding your bike more is one of your ways to get fit, cold, snow, and ice can be a challenge. Consider a year of cycling to improve your physical and mental health.

Outside Magazine started the year with an article encouraging more people to take up biking.

Theoretically, getting more people to ride should be easy. Never in the history of cycling has there been a wider range of bicycles and riding styles on offer to the American consumer. However, there’s still a pretty significant barrier of entry to cycling here in America, and it’s called the prospect of death.

But how dangerous is cycling really? Unfortunately it’s difficult to say with numerical certainty, because the annual number of bicycle deaths doesn’t tell the entire story. We do know that somewhere around 800 people per year are killed in cycling crashes, but what we don’t have is the necessary data to calculate cyclist mortality per miles traveled.

The article highlights the importance of avoiding cars, using sensible bike gear, and slowing down (for the road racing types).

I bike commute. I select and plan my routes carefully and know them well. It is important to me that I avoid what I would consider dangerous streets and stick to more pleasant neighborhood streets or roads with lower traffic volumes and speeds. I wear bright gear and usually have lights with me, especially in the winter months because it is important to be seen by motorists.

My bike commute is my main exercise. I measure every trip on a GPS app to track myself, which makes it a little more fun. I biked nearly 4,600 miles and burned more than 176,000 calories. More than 2,900 of those miles and 116,000 of the calories were on my work commutes. It is a vital part of my day to bike to work. I rotate among three bikes and take different routes to keep it interesting. It takes planning and more attention to the weather and my daily schedule, but I’ve been able to make it work to my advantage.

Commuting by bike to work and for errands does improve physical and mental health. A recent study focusing on the health aspects of biking for transportation was highlighted on REI’s blog:

Is there something about riding your bike that makes you feel better? Well, it turns out science may validate your experience. An article recently published in Environmental International suggests that those who use a bicycle as a form of transportation may maintain higher levels of self-perceived health than drivers, walkers and public transportation users and also experience lower levels of stress.

The study found that overall biking gave cyclists more energy and less stress than people who didn’t bike (seem obvious, but good to confirm). It also found that those cyclists had better engagement and involvement with their communities. “[B]iking forces us to slow down and interact with our surroundings in a different way—something that can be relaxing, exciting and generally more fulfilling,” according to the article. I certainly find that I am much more loyal and attentive to the places along the most common routes I bike. I make errands and some work trips out to be opportunities to exercise, which not only keeps me fit but prevents me from burning fuel with my vehicle while also saving a little money. That’s a win-win.

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Still achieved 2018 bike commuting goals, despite obstacles

Riggan family visit to the Virginia Creeper Trail, spring 2018.The year 2018 was another good one for bike rides. Not a record-setter due to a variety of mechanical issues and the reality that rain and snow hampered the early and late months, but I still met my commuting goals and made time for a few fun rides.

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Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor may provide a safer route for bike/ped in Westhampton

Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor

Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor

The University of Richmond may hold the key for safe passage between the Huguenot Bridge and the Near West End and Henrico County with the implementation of its plan to develop a trail along Little Westham Creek.

“The finished Eco-Corridor will also feature a multi-use recreational trail between Westhampton Way and River Road,” according to the plan for the Gambles Mill Eco-Corridor.

 

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Richmond’s Jefferson Davis corridor deserves for old promises to be kept

JeffDavis3

I had the pleasure of touring the Jefferson Davis corridor of southside Richmond with members of Richmond Cabinet. Before departing, the group more than 60 attendees was presented many issues relating to the area, including education, housing, transportation and the Richmond Marine Terminal.

 

Getting outside of my daily routine and opening my mind to other people’s walks of life has always been inspiring to me. This opportunity delivered. Continue reading

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‘Not a Scientist’ explores many ways politicians evade science, climate change

NotAScientist

Over the turbulent past couple of years, many Americans have become more politically aware. No matter which party you back, the challenges to balance of power in the United State of America has been complicated by a lack of facts.

Science has essentially been neglected or even tossed aside by the Trump administration. The book Not a Scientist: How Politicians Mistake, Misrepresent and Utterly Mangle Science, author Dave Levitan attempts to identify the many ways in which politicians have abused or ignored science. The book was  quite humorous and a quick read.  Continue reading

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